The Congressional Martian Caucus
Posted on 03.19.16 by Danny Glover @ 10:41 am

Last week a man named Kyle Odom sent to the media a manifesto that accused several members of Congress of being “noteworthy Martians.” Until then, Americans might have assumed that all members of Congress were from outer space.

Now we know there are just a few dozen members of the Congressional Martian Caucus. Here’s a helpful photo guide (and an alphabetical list) to spot them when you’re on Capitol Hill:


Filed under: Government and Just For Laughs and News & Politics and People
Comments: None

Thomas Edison Invented Cat Videos
Posted on 03.06.16 by Danny Glover @ 8:59 am

Thomas Edison invented cat videos long before the Internet. In the nasty spirit of this year’s Republican presidential primary, his boxing cats should be named King Trump and Little Marco.


Filed under: Just For Laughs and News & Politics and Video
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Lady Gaga’s Mom Was A WVU Cheerleader
Posted on 02.09.16 by Danny Glover @ 7:41 pm

I knew Lady Gaga had some West Virginia roots — she even gave the state a plug in her song “Born This Way” — but until today I didn’t know her Mom was a West Virginia University cheerleader.

That bit of history popped into my Facebook feed yesterday in the form of a picture of Mother Gaga in WVU cheerleading garb, and Lady Gaga herself confirmed it today by sharing the photo on Instagram. The family resemblance is obvious.


Mommy captain cheerleader at a football game for WVU years ago, so cool to see this floating around Facebook. ❤️🌭 by @ladygaga


Filed under: Music and People and Social Media and Technology and West Virginia
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The Donald J. Trump Book Of Insults
Posted on 02.06.16 by Danny Glover @ 10:22 am

Jeb Bush delivered a stern message to Donald Trump at the Republican presidential debate last December: “You’re not going to be able to insult your way to the presidency. That’s not going to happen.” Bush was so certain of the claim that he repeated it later in the debate.

A few weeks later, Sen. Ted Cruz questioned Trump’s demeanor for the presidency after Trump aimed a series of Twitter barbs at Cruz. “I think in terms of a commander-in-chief,” Cruz said, “we ought to have someone who isn’t springing out of bed to tweet in a frantic response to the latest polls.”

But if the results of this week’s Iowa caucuses are any indication, both Bush and Cruz may be wrong. Even though he finished second to Cruz, Trump won 24 percent of the vote in the first balloting of the 2016 campaign. It sure looks like plenty of Americans are comfortable with the idea of a president who throws rhetorical sticks and stones.

Instead of being “the worst thing that ever happened in Donald Trump’s life,” Twitter may be his ticket to the White House. It’s the perfect platform for calling out all of the “stupidity” he sees in America, whether real or imagined.

Trump’s love of all words denigrating is well-documented and predates his presidential campaign. He has been ranting online for years.

But Trump really came into his own boorish self once he launched his bid to become the leader of the free world. The insults have been flowing freely since then — so much so that both The New York Times and The Washington Post have compiled lists of all the people, companies and entire professions he has trashed.

It’s quite a Twitter stream Trump has going there — if you’re into gawking at gruesome highway wrecks, that is,” technology activist Lauren Weinstein wrote in a blog post suggesting that Twitter should ban Trump. “Onslaughts against individuals. Similar attacks against organizations, even against entire races. White supremacist propaganda. On and on and on. Try retrospectively reading Donald’s tweets without feeling the need to vomit — virtually impossible if you’re a socialized human being and not someone raised by hyenas.”

Trump’s crudest attacks trigger feeding frenzies in the press, making his enemies giddy with anticipation of falling poll numbers that never come.

But his rudeness has become so routine that most people don’t even pay attention — and when they do it’s often to celebrate Trump’s willful intolerance of the tolerance police or his willingness to get in the faces of journalists. A large swath of the electorate seems eager to follow any leader with the guts to be politically incorrect, and he is a master at promoting that persona, especially online.

“The relationship between Trump and Twitter is the perfect marriage of man and medium,” The Daily Beast concluded. “His terse insults are perfectly suited to the 140-character form and his controversy-a-day campaign feeds off of Twitter’s short attention span.” CNN media reporter Brian Stelter recognized Trump’s Twitter mastery, too: “I can’t help but wonder if his Twitter account is more effective at this point than a TV ad.”

Trump has been so good at being bad that, win or lose the presidency, he deserves a book to memorialize his infamous nastiness – one that mean-spirited people can turn to for offensive inspiration. I’ve published that book, including dozens of embedded Trump insults, at Storify.


Filed under: Culture and Media and News & Politics and People and Social Media and Technology
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I’m A Registered Drone Pilot
Posted on 01.14.16 by Danny Glover @ 8:23 pm

As of today, I’m officially a registered drone owner! That means I’ve agreed to fly by these rules:

These rules already existed, and they are reasonable precautions to ensure safe skies. I’m not sure what the big deal is, so I readily registered before Jan. 21 to get a credit for the $5 fee.

(Full disclosure: I’m a writer at the FAA, but I’m speaking only for me.)


Filed under: Aviation and Government and Technology
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There’s A Cougar In Them Thar Hills
Posted on 01.03.16 by Danny Glover @ 5:14 pm

There are no cougars in Wayne County, W.Va. By official accounts, there are no cougars anywhere in wild, wonderful West Virginia. In fact, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service concluded in 2011 that the eastern cougar is no longer endangered because it is extinct.

But for a few days last month, a Prichard, W.Va., man named J.R. Hundley deceived a whole bunch of gullible people on Facebook into thinking he had seen one near his house. “I think he killed my [pit bull]! Something tore him up pretty bad,” Hundley wrote Dec. 16.

When asked by Facebook readers, Hundley divulged phony details about the origins of the picture. He implied that he took the photo on “my driveway up the hill to my house” on Lower Gragston Creek Road. When one reader voiced concern about a free-roaming mountain lion killing pets and livestock, Hundley even offered this reassurance about the one he never actually saw: “I was gone, came home and found him. He wasn’t mean at all!”

Nearly 1,600 people shared his warning about a puma on the prowl in the hills, and another 600 liked it. You could tell from the comments that locals wanted to believe it was true, if only to justify their unfounded fears that mountain lions are in the area. Some people spread rumors of their own.

“We saw one cross the road in Prichard a few years ago in front of us, but it was black,” Carrie Ann Bragg wrote. Kathy Baker Rice shared this tale: “I saw one on Bear Creek a few years ago, just about three miles from Buchanan, Ky., which is across the Big Sandy River from Prichard. Huge.”

Cara Nelson-Hall suggested that the mountain lion Hundley imagined was not alone. “They’re on Davis branch. We hear them,” she said. And Jim Reed cried conspiracy by state game officials. “I bet DNR released him out there, lol,” he said half-jokingly. “I would call them and ask them if they did and tell them to pay [you] for your pit bull.”

Appalachian Magazine bought into Hundley’s story, touting it and other alleged sightings of mountain lions in Appalachia under the headline “Mountain Lion Sighted in West Virginia.” Several readers told their own cougar tales in the comments of the magazine’s Facebook page and ridiculed the doubters.

“Anyone that thinks there are no panthers in West Virginia is a fool,” Opal Marcum said. “They are in Wayne County, Mingo County and Logan County for sure. Just because you don’t see them doesn’t mean they don’t see you.”

But discerning readers quickly pegged Hundley as a hoaxer. “Also look out for the notorious Sasquatch,” Travis Boone mocked. “He’s around too!!”

Some critics assumed that the picture was real and that Hundley edited a mountain lion into it. But as it turns out, the entire photo is real (along with a second one like it). Hundley just didn’t take it.

The photos were published on three Facebook pages, Hunting Trophy Trips, Oregon Outdoor Hunters and Oregon Outdoor Council. Oregon State University forestry student Hayden England saw the cougar March 10 while working in the field near Vida, Ore., and the McKenzie River.
(more…)


Filed under: History and Hunting & Guns and Media and People and Social Media and West Virginia and Wildlife
Comments: None

The Arsenal Of Democracy Remembered
Posted on 12.12.15 by Danny Glover @ 12:14 pm

Back in the spring, I took a media flight aboard a B-25 bomber the day before the Arsenal Of Democracy flyover of the nation’s capital. The official footage of the actual flyover was released a couple of days ago, and it is amazing!

This was taped in some of the most restricted airspace in the country and took months of planning with multiple federal agencies. You’ll probably never see air-to-air video like this again, so take a few minutes to watch it.

If you’re in a hurry, the best clip runs from 2:22 in the video until the shot of the breakaway plane in the missing man formation ends at 3:07. I flew aboard Betty’s Dream. She gets a two-second cameo at the 2:37 mark.


Filed under: Aviation and History and Military and Video
Comments: 1 Comment

Joel Pett Hates Adopted Kids
Posted on 11.20.15 by Danny Glover @ 8:12 pm

Joel Pett, the editorial cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader, chose to celebrate National Adoption Month this week by using the children of Kentucky Gov.-elect Matt Bevin as “mere props” to mock Bevin’s stance on Syrian refugees.

Bevin has said that when he takes office, he will work to keep Syrian refugees out of the Bluegrass State. That stance, one echoed by dozens of governors, didn’t please Pett so he attacked by drawing pictures of Bevin’s Ethiopian children into a cartoon. The strip depicts Bevin hiding under his desk, with an aide holding a family photo and saying: “Sir they’re not terrorists. … They’re your own adopted kids.”

As a journalist and vocal proponent of free speech, I give editorial cartoonists wide latitude for using mockery to make a point. But as an adoptive parent, I can’t let this tasteless jab go without engaging in some free speech of my own: The cartoon is despicable; Pett is obnoxious for drawing it; and the newspaper is tone deaf for publishing it as the country celebrates adoption.

Pett sounds petty when he says Bevin started it by using his children in campaign commercials first. He sounds arrogant when he says he has endured “little controversies” like the outcry over the cartoon for 30 years and scolds Bevin for rising to the bait. And Pett plays the hypocrite when he accuses the critics of Syrian refugee policy of demagoguery even as he engages in it himself.

The Herald-Leader is equally hypocritical for publishing a cartoon that uses a politician’s children as pawns. Journalists rightly raise questions when the children of Democrats are the targets of such attacks. Remember, this time last year an obscure Republican aide was driven from her job on Capitol Hill after mocking Sasha and Malia Obama. But let a Republican win a key race like Bevin did two weeks ago and suddenly his children are no longer off limits.

Bevin missed the mark in his reaction to the cartoon. Without any supporting evidence, he accused Pett of holding to a “deplorably racist ideology” and the newspaper of allowing “overt racism” into its pages. (It’s worth noting that editorial-page editor Vanessa Gallman, who approved the cartoon and said she “did not see in it the issue of race that Bevin has raised,” is black.)

But Pett and the newspaper crossed a line they shouldn’t have. Shame on them.

P.S. I have no reason to believe that Pett actually hates adopted kids, but he’s clearly a big fan of distorting people’s true opinions. I figured he would appreciate the headline.

Full disclosure: Several years ago I interviewed for a job as an editorial columnist at the Herald-Leader. I don’t recall whether I met Pett, but I did interview with Gallman. The paper offered the columnist’s job to one of its editorial writers.


Filed under: Adoption and Government and Media and News & Politics and People
Comments: 1 Comment

The Christian Response To Syrian Refugees
Posted on 11.18.15 by Danny Glover @ 6:25 pm

Accepting or rejecting Syrian refugees is a policy issue, not a spiritual one, and some politicians and religious figures are taking Christians on guilt trips in order to convince them otherwise. This is both discouraging and devious.

The current appeals to Christian conscience as a way to advocate an open-door policy typically go something like this: God demands that His followers show compassion to those who are less fortunate, especially widows and orphans. He also tells us not to worry in general or to fear those who can kill our bodies. This means Christians should support Syrian immigration and reject irrational fears about terrorists who might use immigration policy to sneak into the country.

While the teachings behind that rationale are true, they are not particularly relevant to the ongoing policy debate. Here’s why:

  • Most of the New Testament is written to individual Christians, local congregations or the church as a whole. Relatively little of it addresses secular government, and the parts that do mention it are about God’s design for government (“a minister of God to you for good,” “an avenger who brings wrath on the one who practices evil”) and our relationship to it.

    In our democratic republic, Christians can and should encourage leaders to incorporate biblical values into governing policies. Showing compassion and overcoming fear arguably may be values that our government should weigh in developing policies about Syrian refugees.

    But to the extent that those teachings directly apply, it is only to individual Christians who: 1) could show compassion to refugees if they eventually are welcomed into the country; and 2) should not let themselves be ruled by fear of Syrians in particular or Muslims in general.

  • The suggestion that it is immoral to oppose the immigration of Syrians is scripturally flawed for another reason. The belief is built upon the notion that it is wrong to ever turn away refugees, but the United States does that all the time.

    By last count, there are about 60 million refugees in the world. About 9 million Syrians alone have fled their homes since 2011, and 6.5 million are still displaced. The current debate in the United States is over 10,000 refugees. Even in the next two years, our government is talking about admitting no more than an additional 185,000 refugees from various countries.

    The United States has approved the entrance of less than 800,000 refugees since changing its policies after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The total number to enter the United States since 1975 is 3.25 million, still well shy of the number of Syrians left homeless by civil war and the jihad of terrorists.

If it is immoral to keep 10,000 Syrians at arm’s length for security reasons, what about the millions of others still stuck in that country? Aren’t we compelled as a “Christian nation” not only to welcome them but to use all of our resources to rescue them? Shouldn’t we have done something long ago, initially to prevent this tragedy and later to put an end to it?

And what about the rest of the world’s refugees? Do Christians sin if they do not advocate opening our borders to all of them immediately? If not, where are we supposed to draw the line, and what factors are righteous to consider when drawing that line? And if it’s OK to draw lines, how can anyone possibly argue that it is sinful to draw them now to ensure the safety of the hundreds of millions of people who already call America home?

The phrase “while we have opportunity” in Gal. 6:10 keeps coming to my mind: “So then, while we have opportunity, let us do good to all people, and especially to those who are of the household of the faith.”

Maybe Syrian refugees are such an opportunity for the United States, and maybe Christians should be the loudest voice for such compassion. But these decisions are not as simple as politicians and religious leaders like to pretend in their spiritually manipulative platitudes.


Filed under: Government and News & Politics and Religion
Comments: 1 Comment

Why Post The French Flag Colors On Facebook?
Posted on 11.15.15 by Danny Glover @ 7:25 pm

One of my friends asked a good question on Facebook today: “Why change your profile picture to have the French flag colors on them? Changing your picture does what and for whom?”

I actually gave the question some thought before I changed my picture — a first for me and thus not something I do lightly — and again after he asked the question, so I thought I’d share my explanation here in addition to on his Facebook wall.

For me, a profile picture with the French colors superimposed on it makes a multifaceted statement:

One of empathy with the people of France. I was in Washington on 9/11, within walking distance of the White House, one of the presumed potential targets of the plane that went down in Pennsylvania. I remember what it was like walking to the Metro at the end of that workday, the capital city all but empty except for military vehicles and armed soldiers. The terror was palpable.

One of solidarity with the French government. However you decide to pursue and punish ISIS for this evil, I am behind you. (Hours ago, the French bombed some ISIS targets in Syria.)

One of purpose for our president, lawmakers and military leaders. I want them to stop saying terror is “contained” and start committing the money and people necessary to do it.

One of importance to my Facebook friends. As I mentioned, the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks on France mark the first time I’ve been motivated to change my Facebook profile picture for a cause. That has been intentional. Many things matter to me. I write about some of them on Facebook and on this blog. This particular historical event matters enough to also merit a simple, symbolic gesture that won’t change anything but will let people know the attacks have changed me.


Filed under: Blogging and Family and Government and Military and News & Politics and Social Media
Comments: 1 Comment

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